A ‘game’ Technique to Improve Cognitive Ability in the Elderly with Dementia: Implications for Care Management

By Rozainee Khairuddin, Rohany Nasir, Zainah Ahmad Zamani, Fatimah Yusooff and Fatimah Omar.

Published by The Organization Collection

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Dementia is the progressive decline in cognitive function due to damage or disease in the body beyond what might be expected from normal aging. It is a non-specific illness syndrome in which affected areas of cognition may be memory, attention, language, and problem solving. Higher mental functions are affected first in the process. Especially in the later stages of the condition, affected persons may be disoriented in time (not knowing what day of the week, day of the month, month, or even what year it is), in place (not knowing where they are), and in person (not knowing who they are or others around them). This paper reported the use of a technique involving a game that focuses on two cognitive functions - memory and problem solving. The ‘game’ was developed by first experimenting with a few essential perceptual factors such as vision and hearing in the elderly with dementia. On the basis of the observation, we came up with two games (i.e., memory and problem solving) that were later used in training to improve cognitive functions of the elderly with dementia. After three sessions of training that ran across two months we compared the reaction times and scores of the participants from the two games. The results suggest an improvement in the memory as well as problem solving abilities of the elderly. These experimental results are hoped to contribute as a method in the rehabilitation of the elderly with dementia.

Keywords: Dementia, Elderly, Cognitive Ability, Memory, Problem Solving

International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, Volume 10, Issue 9, pp.29-40. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 1017.631KB).

Dr. Rozainee Khairuddin

Lecturer, School of Psychology and Human Development, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia

I am very much involved in research on cognition which is my area of specialization. Being in a research university I do a lot of research and my focus is mainly on dementia, adolescents and certain gender issues.

Prof. Rohany Nasir

Lecturer, School of Psychology and Human Development, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia

I am a professor in counseling psychology. Being in a research university, I am very much involved in research, teaching, writing and practice of counseling. My interest is in career counseling, family counseling, gender issues and group interventions/work.

Assoc. Prof. Zainah Ahmad Zamani

Associate Professor/Lecturer, School of Psychology and Human Development, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia

I am a lecturer in the field of counseling psychology. I am involved in research, teaching and the practice of counseling. My research focus is organizational counseling, career counseling and family counseling. I have conducted research on gender issues, adolescents and drug abuse, organizational counseling and family issues.

Dr. Fatimah Yusooff

Associate Professor/Lecturer, School of Psychology and Human Development, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia

Being in a research university I am involved in research. My research interests are family counseling, marriage counseling and multicultural counseling.

Dr. Fatimah Omar

Lecturer, School of Psychology and Human Development, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Univesiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia

I have been involved in several research projects. My area of specialization in Industrial and organizational psychology and my research interest is job performance, management performance, job satisfaction, job stress and burn out.

Reviews:

There are currently no reviews of this product.

Write a Review