A Comparison between e-Government Practices in New Zealand and Oman

By Eric Deakins, Stuart Dillon and Hamed Al Namani.

Published by The Organization Collection

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Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Although e-government has been studied ever since it first appeared in the USA, little work has been focused on the Arabic region where the political, social, economic, and cultural environments can differ markedly from those of Western countries. This paper reports the results of a (late-2006) study in which a survey was used to collect data from policymakers in 32 civil service ministries and other public organizations, to obtain a snapshot of Omani e-government practices; these results were compared with results obtained from a similar study by the same research team in New Zealand late in 2004. Observed overall was a good level of agreement between Omani and New Zealander respondents for 4 key issues which, the authors argue are critical for successful e-government: Efficiency, Accessibility, Security and Privacy. Similarly, Omani and New Zealander policymakers agreed on a medium level of significance for the 4 key issues: Digital Divide, Private Sector, Trust and IT workforce (and on a low level of significance for the key issue E-tailing). The relative lack of significance being attached by Omani respondents to the more collaborative issues of e-government, plus their heightened significance on legislation and consumer confidence indicate the relative lack of experience of Omani policymakers, at least when compared with their New Zealand counterparts. In an era of (commercial) online social networking, it was found that New Zealand and Omani public organizations continue to favour providing useful information rather than collaborative service channels with contractors and suppliers, or integration of processes to satisfy citizens.

Keywords: e-Government, International Comparison

The International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, Volume 7, Issue 5, pp.51-64. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 870.317KB).

Dr Eric Deakins

Senior Lecturer, Department of Management Systems, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

Dr. Eric Deakins early career was as a navigation officer in the British merchant navy and, following graduation, he taught naval architecture at the University of Plymouth and managed a Computer Aided Design and Imaging Centre, and a Maritime Research Centre. He has successfully steered major IS projects to completion in the UK and the USA. Both his MBA and doctorate focused on the simulation of dynamic risk in various management settings and, more recently, he has set up and managed a dot-com company. Currently, Eric is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Management Systems at the University of Waikato (New Zealand), where he researches and teaches in the broad areas of information systems, supply chain integration and e-Government/e-Commerce implementation. Eric undertakes consultancy work for a diverse range of public and community-based organisations.

Dr. Stuart Dillon

Senior Lecturer, Department of Management Systems, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

Dr. Stuart Dillon is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Management Systems at the University of Waikato. His principle area of research is concerned with the naturalistic decision processes of business leaders. In addition to this, he is also presently involved in research in the fields of Decision Support Systems, e-Government and e-Commerce.

Hamed Al Namani

PhD Student, Department of Management Systems, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

Mr. Hamed Al Namani is currently working on his doctorate. His research interest is in the area of online social networking and its implications for future forms of e-Government.

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