Experiences of Nurses During a Hospital Management Transfer

By Minako Sasaki, Ayako Nagata, Mami Ohnishi, Chie Matsutani and Katsuya Kanda.

Published by The Organization Collection

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

The Japanese health care system has been radically reformed due to continuing increases in expenditures resulting from the rapidly aging population. Many hospitals are being restructured or merged with other hospitals. In order to describe the experiences of nurses during hospital restructuring, we interviewed nurses working in a hospital that was scheduled for closure and replacement by an academic hospital. A total of 47 nurses, including 5 nurse managers, participated in the study. After obtaining informed consent, nurses were asked questions about their experiences during the restructuring process and its effect on their personal lives, the nursing team, and relationships between nurses and management. Even though nurses felt anxious soon after learning about the hospital closure, they decided their course of action while reconsidering their jobs, working conditions, and expectations of family members. Providing information and opportunities to learn about nursing career paths is essential in preparing for hospital restructuring. During the transition period, units merged and nurses were required to carry out extra tasks, which caused disarray within the units. Having supervisor support in accomplishing the extra tasks also promoted confidence and had a positive effect on teamwork. Hospital restructuring offered opportunities for nurses to reconsider their career paths. It is very important to facilitate organizational learning for positive changes before and during hospital restructuring.

Keywords: Restructuring, Hospital Nurses, Organizational Change, Career Development

International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, Volume 8, Issue 6, pp.97-100. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 564.732KB).

Minako Sasaki

Lecturer, Department of Nursing Administration, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

Minako Sasaki is a Lecturer of the department of Nursing Administration at the Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. She received a Master of Science in Nursing from Simmons College in Boston, MA, and a Doctorate of Health Sciences from The University of Tokyo. Her research interest includes risk management and the safety and health of hospital nurses.

Ayako Nagata

Department of Nursing Administration, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

Ayako Nagata is an Assistant Professor of the department of Nursing Administration at the Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Mami Ohnishi

Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing Administration, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

Mami Ohnishi is an Assistant Professor of the department of Nursing Administration at the Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Chie Matsutani

Department of Nursing Administration, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

Chie Matsutani is a Doctoral Student of the department of Nursing Administration at the Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Katsuya Kanda

Professor, Department of Nursing Administration, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

Dr. Katsuya Kanda is a Professor of the department of Nursing Administration at the Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

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