Local e-Government Impact and Policymakers’ Attitude towards Adopting Contemporary Information Technologies

By Eric Deakins, Stuart Dillon and Hamed Al Namani.

Published by The Organization Collection

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

This paper compares and contrasts the results of studies undertaken in late-2007, in which data was collected from 57 local government organizations based in the United Kingdom and New Zealand. The aim was to determine policymaker perceptions of the impact of their own e-government initiatives, the nature of planned initiatives, and attitudes towards adopting contemporary information technologies such as online social networks.
Against a backdrop of limited capital and staff resources, technology integration difficulties, and patchy leadership; policymakers expressed a low level of agreement that their e-government initiatives had achieved significant benefits for organizations and citizens. Future service improvements are targeted at quality of online services, citizen satisfaction, and productivity; and although UK local authorities are generally more willing than their NZ counterparts to involve citizens in decision making and to being accountable, the desire to provide copious quantities of information more conveniently is dominating thinking in both countries. It also appears that local authorities wish to remain firmly in control of their citizen transactions; hence it is judged likely that contemporary Web-based applications such as blogs and online discussion forums will not be routinely utilized in the near future. It is debatable how this will impact already low rates of citizen acceptance of online government services by citizens who expect to have real control over local decisions, and who increasingly use online social networks in their everyday lives.
Being a cross-country study of the impacts, philosophies, and intentions of local e-government policymakers at opposite ends of the world, it is anticipated that this paper will be of interest to local government policymakers and to e-government and social networking researchers.

Keywords: E-government, International Comparison, Local Government, Technology Adoption, Social Networking, E-government Impact

International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, Volume 8, Issue 10, pp.123-134. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 732.347KB).

Dr Eric Deakins

Senior Lecturer, Department of Management Systems, University of Waikato Management School, Hamilton, New Zealand

Eric Deakins teaches and researches in the Department of Management Systems at the University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand; having previously worked both in the UK and USA in senior management and business consulting roles. His current research interests are in the areas of supply chain integration, innovation management, and e-government. Eric publishes in refereed journals across a range of topics related to his research interests, and serves on several editorial boards. He has over sixty publications. Consulting activities involve innovation management and process redesign, with recent assignments for companies as diverse as Sri Lanka Insurance and Heinz-Wattie Ltd.

Dr. Stuart Dillon

Senior Lecturer, Department of Management Systems, University of Waikato Management School, Hamilton, New Zealand

Stuart Dillon is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Management Systems at the University of Waikato. His principle area of research is concerned with the naturalistic decision processes of business leaders. In addition to this, he is also presently involved in research in the fields of Decision Support Systems, E-government and E-commerce.

Hamed Al Namani

PhD Student, Department of Management Systems, University of Waikato Management School, Hamilton, New Zealand

Hamed Al Namani is currently working on his doctorate. His research interest is in the area of online social networking and its implications for future forms of e-government.

Reviews:

There are currently no reviews of this product.

Write a Review